Teaching and Learning Lab:
SEI Workshop Catalog

APPROACHING CULTURAL APPROPRIATION

David Borgonjon (Critic, Painting & Sculpture)

During the "Kimono Wednesdays" debacle at the Boston Museum, many Japanese states were puzzled by protestors' objections. Yet a few years later, when Kim Kardashian mooted her Kimono shapewear line, there was an outcry in the Japanese media. What, exactly, was different in the two cases? We may often think of cultural appropriation as bad, but it's important to delve into the whole range of bads that it includes. Because we're in the business of culture, "cultural appropriation" can be an idea that does a lot of work in the classroom. It poses the question: what belongs to who, in what ways, and what does that mean? From a point of self-reflection, we will begin to examine the kinds of historical debts that cultural appropriation always implies---and the possibility of a reparative approach to art and design.

ANTI-ASIAN/ASIAN AMERICAN RACISM IN THE TIME OF COVID19

David Borgonjon (Critic, Painting & Sculpture); Nora Khan (Critic, Digital + Media); Maia Chao (Critic, Sculpture); David Kim (Director, Co-Works); and Matthew Shenoda (moderator)

Including discussion of antecedents to and manifestations of anti-Asian racism in this present moment, this panel will   as well as some ways to think about pedagogy and critique in support of our students in this time of heightened anti-Asian/Asian-American racism. Participants are asked to read (if they are able) the below articles and be prepared for an open discussion that will link these issues with our present day pedagogy and our social and institutional realities.

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Additional Readings and Resources:

The Slur I Never Expected to Hear in 2020, NYT, Hong

The Stories We Tell, And Don’t Tell, About Asian-American Lives, New Yorker, Hua Hsu


Racism is a Public Health Issue  
LACMA PANEL: Addressing Prejudices Against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 Pandemic; 5/7/20, 4–5:30 PM PST


We are not COVID
On Performing the Critical, Billie Lee
https://www.stopdiscriminasian.org/

 

BODYMIND INTELLIGENCE: A CONVERSATION AND PRACTICAL WORKSHOP ON SOMATICS, LEARNING, AND TEACHING

Liz Maynard (Lecturer, THAD)

This workshop offers personal and pedagogical tools for acknowledging and engaging what the body has to teach us: in the classroom, the cycle of the school year, and as an indicator of our creative experiences both on and off campus. We'll come to an understanding of somatics and felt experience through conversation, individual and partnered attention practices, and consider how sense awareness can be a starting point for individual creative practice and classroom engagement.

CREATING AN EMBODIED ONLINE CLASSROOM

Liz Maynard (Lecture, THAD)

This workshop is designed to address some of the strange vicissitudes of online teaching, with practical examples and tips for discussion in an online group, creating an engaging container, pacing class time, bringing embodied connection to the “classroom,” and acknowledging the stressors and anxieties that are shifting our teaching/learning environment. While designed to address the lecture/discussion model of a liberal arts classroom, conversation around community, embodiment, and confronting the challenges of remote learning are relevant to all.

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CREATING INCLUSIVE SYLLABI

Patricia Felisa Barbeito (Dean of Faculty)

The course syllabus is often a student’s first contact with you and your course; it sets the tone for the course and plays a crucial role in clarifying goals and expectations. How, then, to create a syllabus that both effectively conveys what you want to say about the course and invites students to actively engage in the learning process?

CRITIQUE CULTURES

Sheri Wills (Department Head, FAV)

The classroom critique is often depicted as a foundation of art & design education as if there were one, universally understood process. In practice, there are differing discussion-based review practices between disciplines and between faculty.

An important aspect of what makes critiques both challenging and valuable, across the curriculum, is the essential function we perform of socializing students to the criterion of our field. Sometimes this is explicit, but often we more subtly guide students to understand the boundaries of what is and isn’t admissible, without consciously acknowledging or questioning the complex cultural frameworks that inform those perspectives.

Experimenting with various critique formats is one way to become better equipped to reveal the social, cultural, and disciplinary norms we bring to the classroom – and make those frameworks available for critique, as well.

ENGAGING COMMUNITY IN PROVIDENCE

Laura Briggs (Associate Professor, Architecture)
 
Whereas students learn how design can play a role in nurturing culturally-diverse vibrant neighborhoods while creating positive change within a dynamic society, community engagement has the power to leverage cross-sector partnerships between creative non-profits, governmental, and private higher education to stimulate new types of design thinking and entrepreneurial activities. Sustained dialog builds trust and creates the ability to identify real needs and desires of community members. This workshop will explore models of community engagement and their relevance for RISD and our local community by investigating more sustained integration of individual initiatives into the curriculum and review examples of community engagement starting with 1960’s participatory models to more recent examples of “Creative Placemaking”.

The three workshop sessions will be organized to address different issues and will progress from theoretical frameworks and quickly move to address questions of engagement and actions. The first meeting will involve review of contemporary arguments around Creative Placemaking and other models of social activities. The second meeting will involve a conversation with local community stake-holders and leaders from governmental and non-profit groups about community needs and their experiences in working with academic institutions. And the third meeting will be an opportunity to evaluate our capacity at RISD and to discuss obstacles and opportunities to support future projects with the greatest potential impact.

EQUITABLE GRADING & DIVERSE CLASSROOMS

Jessica Metzler (Senior Associate Director for the Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning at Brown University)

Equitable grading involves providing support and opportunities to help students from all backgrounds meet course goals and demonstrate the scope of their learning. This research-based interactive workshop discusses ways to approach the evaluation of student learning through a framework that values high standards and individual development.

INTERNAL FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES AT RISD

Janine Connelly (Senior Budget Analyst)
Patricia Felisa Barbeito (Dean of Faculty)

RISD offers a range of internal funding opportunities to support faculty research, teaching, and professional development. This information session provides an overview of these opportunities, the nuts-and-bolts of the application and budgeting processes (and any related troubleshooting), and how to write an effective proposal and itemized budget.

INTRO TO SELF-CARE

Liz Maynard (Lecturer, THAD)

Feeling burnt out or worn thin? Take the time to “fill your tank” so you’re operating in a more resourced way! This two workshop series is an introduction to the concept of self-care, with opportunities for different kinds of nourishing practice. We will make space for discussion, gentle movement, deep breathing, and meditation. Our intention is to reflect on the purpose of self-care and develop realistic and practical routines that work for our individual habits and schedules. The workshops build on each other but can be attended individually.

QUESTIONING RESEARCH: SHAPING PRACTICES

Sarah Bainter Cunningham (Associate Provost for Research Practices and Strategic Partnerships)

Intended to adapt to serve the participating faculty, this workshop will address national funding trends, specific deadlines, and upcoming opportunities; how to plan for research time, how to think about budgets, and how to navigate one's personal social media platforms to promote work. There will also be critical questioning on how funding networks can fail to serve faculty needs and build new supports that break through conventional standards. Some examples will be given of collective projects that have recently opened new ways of thinking about support, in order for to critically discuss sometimes-limiting research platforms.

MANAGING DIFFICULT MOMENTS IN THE CLASSROOM

Patricia Felisa Barbeito, Dean of Faculty

Moments of tension are an inescapable part of the classroom experience. How can you, as the instructor, use these moments to foster dialogue and learning? In this interactive workshop, we will discuss various strategies for framing and handling such moments, and will work through some case studies in order to practice how to respond in the moment.

SUPPORTING INCLUSION WITH LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Peter Stempel (Provost’s Fellow, Architecture & Design)
 
Learning management systems allow for the creation of unique interactive content for use both in and out of the classroom. Interactive texts, for instance, can be used to provide support for students in using high level content (e.g., primary source materials) and to assess comprehension. These micro-assessments make it possible to reduce reliance on verbal communication in the classroom and allow interactive classroom time to be focused on areas of concern or the most meaningful aspects of readings. These tools are especially valuable for students who don’t speak English as a primary language. Similarly, anonymous text-based tools in the classrooms can make it easier for all students to participate, and to answer questions without fear of stereotype threat or other factors that limit spoken participation. This workshop will include tested examples drawn from real classroom materials used at RISD.

TEACHING MULTILINGUAL LEARNERS

Maya Benezri Krinsky (Assistant Director, Multilingual Learning/Center for Arts & Languages)
 
The term “multilingual learner” refers to anyone whose primary language is not English or whose education and background includes multiple languages, while acknowledging the reality that learning is always influenced and enriched by one’s linguistic and cultural background. Covering general strategies for making the classroom more linguistically inclusive, this workshop explores the role of linguistic diversity in our teaching. Participants review and practice techniques for building a strong supportive classroom across languages, and learn a practical process for responding to students who would like more support in communication-based academic assignments. 

TEACHING SCIENCE TO ARTISTS AND DESIGNERS

Joanna Morris (Provost’s Fellow, HPSS)

RISD has long valued the symbiosis between the arts and sciences, and has been a leader in the movement to include cross-disciplinary perspectives from the sciences in the creative practice of artists and designers. Both the sciences and the arts encourage open-ended inquiry, creative problem-finding, and creative problem-solving. “The artist turns passionate explorations of the wonderful into works of art, and the scientist translates them into words and equations…but what drives innovation in science is inseparable from the elemental urge to express ourselves artistically” (Gurnon, et al. 2013).  In this workshop we will explore the commonalities between the sciences and the arts, discuss the goals of science education and examine best practices for teaching science to artists and designers.

USING A “LIVING SYLLABUS” TO MAKE ACCOUNTABILITY AND ASSESSMENT MORE EQUITABLE

Peter Stempel (Provost’s Fellow, Architecture & Design)

Clarifying learning outcomes as a basis for developing learning activities (backwards design) can make teaching more inclusive and equitable by better elaborating what needs to be addressed in each lesson and clarifying the basis for evaluation. However, academic materials supporting the use of backwards design can sometimes seem overcomplicated and often center on secondary (high school) education. This workshop covers a straight-forward approach to course conversion (moving from forwards design to backwards design) that uses a ‘live’ alignment grid (course schedule connecting learning outcomes and course activities) as a tool for journaling what is taking place in and out of the classroom. This provides insight into the actual objectives of the course. When shared with students, this tool can be a valuable teaching tool that maintains accountability of both faculty and students.

 

SEI Provost’s Fellow Series on Rigor

Chris Roberts (SEI Research Fellow)

EVIDENCE, EXPERTISE, AND THE DESIRES OF RIGOR

What does rigor care about? Who does rigor critique? Rooted in, but not exclusively referencing, Tiffany Lethabo King’s The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies, and Allan De Souza’s How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change this workshop will unsettle our understandings of care and critique; two concepts often in opposition within our respective professions, fields, and classrooms.

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CARE, CRITIQUE, AND THE SHOALS OF RIGOR

What does rigor care about? Who does rigor critique? Rooted in, but not exclusively referencing, Tiffany Lethabo King’s The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies, and Allan De Souza’s How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change this workshop will unsettle our understandings of care and critique; two concepts often in opposition within our respective professions, fields, and classrooms.

JUSTICE, WORK, AND THE WAKES OF RIGOR

What justice does rigor want? Who does the work of rigor? How do we make in the wake of rigor? Rooted in, but not exclusively referencing, Christina Sharpe’s In the Wake: On Blackness and Being, and Allan De Souza’s How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change this workshop will cultivate our commitments to the practices of justice and work; practices often rhetorically deployed in our respective professions, fields, and classrooms. 

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FERPA INFOSESSION AND Q&A

Steve McDonald (RISD’s General Counsel)

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Additional Readings and Resources: